ABOUT

Who is responsible for AHD2.0?

What about Hongwei Guo's group at the College of Life Sciences, Peking University?

What is CBI?

What is AHD and AHD2.0, and what is new in AHD2.0?


Who is responsible for AHD2.0?

AHD2.0 is managed by researchers at the Plant signal transduction lab and the Centre for BioInformatics (CBI), Peking University:

People have been involved in formal version AHD:

What about Hongwei Guo's group at the College of Life Sciences, Peking University?

Phytohormones play essential roles throughout a life span of plants. By a wide range of cross-talks phytohormones response to myriad intrinsic and environmental disturbance. Our Hongwei Guo's Lab (Plant signal transduction lab ) focused on signal transduction pathways of phytohormones especially on gasous hormone ethylene, as well as the cross-talks between different phytohormones and their function in plant development and response to environment.

What is CBI?

The Centre for BioInformatics (CBI, http://www.cbi.pku.edu.cn/) is the first bioinformatics center in China, founded in 1996. It is currently home to seven faculty and staff, one adjunct faculty, and 20 doctorate students. Located in the new Life Science Building on Peking University campus, it houses several computing labs with strong computer hardware and software facilities and a molecular biology lab. While continuing to maintain the first and largest online bioinformatics resource in China as China's official national node of EMBnet, CBI has published in the areas of gene expression regulation, genome analysis and evolution, and pathway networks. CBI is supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, and Natural Science Foundation of China.

What is AHD and AHD2.0, and what is new in AHD2.0?

In 2009 NAR database issue we have published our database AHD: Arabidopsis Hormone Database, which is a collection of hormone related genes in the model organism Arabidopsis. In the database, we integrated detailed gene information as well as a phenotype ontology that is developed to precisely describe myriad hormone-regulated morphological processes with standardized vocabularies. AHD provided a systematic and comprehensive view of genes participating in plant hormonal regulation together with morphological phenotypes controlled by plant hormones in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana.
To increase the coverage of phytohormone related genes, we have updated our database from AHD to Arabidopsis Hormone Database 2.0 (AHD2.0) (http://phd.cbi.pku.edu.cn) by adding and integrating several pronounced features: (1) we added 291 newly published Arabidopsis hormone related genes as well as corrected information (e.g. the arguable ABA receptors) based on the recent 2-year literatures; (2) we integrated orthologues of sequenced plants in OrthoMCLDB into each gene in the database; (3) we integrated predicted miRNA splicing site in each gene in the database; (4) we provided genetic relationship of these phytohormone related genes mining from literatures, which represents the first effort to construct a relatively comprehensive and complex network of hormone related genes as shown in the home page of our database; (5) In convenience to in-time bioinformatics analysis, we also provided links to a powerful online analysis platform Weblab that we have recently developed, which will allow users to readily perform various sequence analysis with these phytohormone related genes retrieved from AHD2.0; (6) we provided links to other protein databases as well as more expression profiling information that would facilitate users for a more systematic analysis related to phytohormone research.